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Master’s Degree Is New Frontier of Study Online

September 3, 2013

Zvi Galil, the dean of the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The institute plans to offer a master’s degree in computer science through massive open online courses, or MOOCs.

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Next January, the Georgia Institute of Technology plans to offer a master’s degree in computer science through massive open online courses for a fraction of the on-campus cost, a first for an elite institution. If it even approaches its goal of drawing thousands of students, it could signal a change to the landscape of higher education.

Sebastian Thrun, a founder of Udacity, a Silicon Valley MOOC provider. He and Dr. Galil have teamed up to offer the online degree, which will cost students $6,600, far less than the $45,000 that it would on campus.

From their start two years ago, when a free artificial intelligence course from Stanford enrolled 170,000 students, free massive open online courses, or MOOCs, have drawn millions and yielded results like the perfect scores of Battushig, a 15-year-old Mongolian boy, in a tough electronics course offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

But the courses have not yet produced profound change, partly because they offer no credit and do not lead to a degree. The disruption may be approaching, though, as Georgia Tech, which has one of the country’s top computer science programs, plans to offer a MOOC-based online master’s degree in computer science for $6,600 — far less than the $45,000 on-campus price.

Zvi Galil, the dean of the university’s College of Computing, expects that in the coming years, the program could attract up to 10,000 students annually, many from outside the United States and some who would not complete the full master’s degree. “Online, there’s no visa problem,” he said.

The program rests on an unusual partnership forged by Dr. Galil and Sebastian Thrun, a founder of Udacity, a Silicon Valley provider of the open online courses.

Although it is just one degree at one university, the prospect of a prestigious low-cost degree program has generated great interest. Some educators think the leap from individual noncredit courses to full degree programs could signal the next phase in the evolution of MOOCs — and bring real change to higher education.

“Perhaps Zvi Galil and Sebastian Thrun will prove to be the Wright brothers of MOOCs,” said S. James Gates Jr., a University of Maryland physicist who serves on President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. “This is the first deliberate and thoughtful attempt to apply education technology to bringing instruction to scale. It could be epoch-making. If it really works, it could begin the process of lowering the cost of education, and lowering barriers for millions of Americans.”

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Here is a certificate that I got from a course that I took online at coursera:

CourseraIHS_certificate

coursera.org

AUGUST 21, 2013
Statement of Accomplishment
WITH DISTINCTION
FRED BLAUER
HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED
Internet History, Technology, and
Security
This undergraduate (first-year level) course reviews the history of
the Internet, explores the technical underpinnings of the Internet
and finishes with an overview of how we communicate in a
secure manner across the Internet.
CHARLES SEVERANCE
CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF
INFORMATION
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PLEASE NOTE: THE ONLINE OFFERING OF THIS CLASS DOES NOT REFLECT THE ENTIRE CURRICULUM OFFERED TO STUDENTS ENROLLED AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT AFFIRM THAT THIS STUDENT WAS ENROLLED AS A STUDENT AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN IN ANY WAY. IT DOES NOT CONFER A UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GRADE; IT DOES NOT CONFER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CREDIT; IT DOES NOT CONFER A UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DEGREE; AND IT DOES NOT VERIFY THE IDENTITY OF THE STUDENT.

Here is the certificate from the guitar course that I took:

Coursera_Guitar_certificate

 

 

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